Tag Archives: IT Pro

Yammer ‘on by default’ network using default Office 365 domain

As you may be aware Yammer ‘on by default’ now as part of Office 365. This means you *may* get a Yammer network provisioned at the *.onmicrosoft.com domain associated with your tenancy.

Yammer 'on by default'
Yammer network using a *.onmicrosoft.com domain

Here’s a tip

If you want to take advantage of this make sure that you create the tenancy as a Trial and then buy licences later. Taking this approach means you get the Yammer ‘on by default’ experience more or less as you would expect, it will be provisioned within a hour or so (maybe sooner).

createtrialtenancy

If you instead purchase a tenant right away, they apparently wait a while as the expectation is that you’ll want to use a vanity domain for your Yammer network… “But I want Yammer ‘on by default’ with my paid tenancy”! You can create a Yammer network on your default Office 365 domain just by logging into Yammer with your *.onmicrosoft.com account BUT you don’t get the integrations with Office 365 – the app launch app, the link to Yammer admin from admin centre. Based on my experience, you will get these integrations eventually – I saw them appear more than 6 weeks later!

I had a long call with Microsoft support regarding this and they weren’t able to provided any solid explanation or reasoning; the information contained in the post is based on my experience rather than official guidance.

Summary

Create new (dev/test) Office 365 tenancies using a Trial subscription and buy licences later if you want to use Yammer without a vanity domain.

Paul.

User photos in Office 365

The user photo story in Office 365 is not so straight forward. Photos are stored in Active Directory (AD) on-premises, Azure Active Directory (AAD), Exchange Online (EXO), SharePoint Online (SPO), and at first appearances possibly elsewhere as well (where does my Delve profile picture live, what about my Skype for Business (SfB) avatar?).

I have put together a flow diagram to represent how this actually works. It aims to demonstrate where user photos are stored and where different applications fetch user photos from (if they don’t store the images), and leads to some recommendations about user photo synchronisation.

Please note the date of this article (August 2016) and be conscious that Office 365 is changing rapidly and the following recommendations may have changed (e.g. Prior to the Delve user profile page, the SharePoint user profile page referenced images stored in SharePoint rather than Exchange. Changes such as these will continue to evolve).

User photos: the diagram

User photos flow in Office 365
User photos flow in Office 365

Where applications store and fetch user photos

Photo Location

Comments

Size

Is source?

On-premises AD DS in the thumbnailPhoto attribute

100Kb maximum

Recommended to be

96×96 or 48×48

Yes

Azure AD in the thumbnailPhoto attribute

100Kb maximum

Usually synced from AD DS via Azure AD Connect

Recommended to be

96×96 or 48×48

No.

Sync from AD

Exchange Online as property of the mailbox

500Kb

Provided manually by users or a bulk import can be scripted if source photos can be located and named appropriately.

If not provided, Exchange will reference the AAD thumbnailPhoto in some instances but only if the thumbnailPhoto is less than 10Kb.

Does not sync back to AD

Recommended to be

648×648

Yes

SharePoint Online ‘User Photos’ library

Three renditions of the EXO photo are automatically created in SharePoint after upload to EXO.

It generally takes up to 72 hours to see changes to EXO photo here. Sometimes we see that a user must ‘touch’ their profile before the sync will be performed.

NOTE: Updating user profile photo via Delve profile is actually updating EXO profile photo and not performing any actions directly in SharePoint Online.

Small is 48 x 48,

Medium is 72 x 72,

Large changes depending on the source image but is always square. I have seen as small as 120 x 120 and as large as 300 x 300. PnP image upload solution uploads these as 200 x 200.

No.

Sync from EXO

Skype for Business

Does not store any images

Uses the high resolution Exchange image if available, otherwise uses the AD thumbnailPhoto

EXO image or AD thumbnailPhoto

No.

Read from EXO

Delve user profile

Does not store any images

Uses the high resolution Exchange image if available, otherwise uses the AD thumbnailPhoto

EXO image or AD thumbnailPhoto

No.

Read from EXO

Yammer

Also stores its own photo. Out of scope of this discussion for now.

Yes

Likely issues and resolutions

Issue

Resolution

Exchange Online user photo is low quality (and in turn so is the SPO photo and SfB photo)

The source image coming from AD was/is low quality.

EXO user photos can be updated by users individually or if high res source photos are available this import can be scripted.

Source images should be jpg of 648×648 (resizing and compression can also be scripted)

Exchange Online user photo is high quality but SfB photo is low quality

High resolution photos from Exchange will be used as long as both Exchange and Sfb/Lync are of new enough versions (2013 or greater) and SfB is configured to allow all photos (not just those from AD).

NB. If a user doesn’t have a mailbox (e.g. not licenced) then they will be displayed using the AD photo

There is no Exchange Online user photo (and in turn there is no SPO photo or SfB photo)

A photo has not been imported to the user’s EXO mailbox and the AAD thumbnailPhoto either doesn’t not contain an image or that image is greater than 10Kb.

Import of photos up to 500Kb to EXO mailbox can be scripted (the source images could be on a file share, or AAD).

Changes to user photos are reflected quickly in Exchange and Skype but take days to replicate to SPO

Exchange to SPO synchronisation is a periodic process and can take up to 72 hours.

A custom solution can perform this replication on demand (e.g. at the same time EXO user photos are set)

User photos changed in other systems which update AD are not reflected in EXO, SPO, SfB.

E.g. A user in an on-premises SharePoint farm updates their user photo

When AD is updated, it is synchronised with AAD but that is as far as it gets as the “sync” from AAD to EXO is one-off import rather than a Sync.

Unlikely to be desirable to create a custom sync relationship here as users will want to be able to update EXO directly and won’t want their photo’s overwritten

User photos updated in EXO aren’t replicated to other systems which share an AD.

E.g. An on-premises SharePoint farm

The user photo in EXO is not synched back to AD – it can’t be consistently as the AD thumbnailPhoto attribute only supports photos up to 100Kb where EXO supports larger images.

Potential for a custom solution to sync images back to AD after having resized/compressed them to <100kb – However general recommendation is that AD thumbnailPhoto optimal size is 10Kb and 96×96.

Recommendations

Use Exchange user photos as the master. Allow users to update their user photos but pre-populate their user photo if possible and before end users are provided any access to the system.

If high resolution photos are available, script import of high resolution photos (648×648) to Exchange Online (see Set-UserPhoto and this). These will then be visible in Exchange, in Skype, and, once processed, in SharePoint Online. In a dispersed environment this may have to be managed by many teams rather than trying to compile a single list of all user photos.

Users may then update their user profile photo directly via Outlook or indirectly via their Delve profile.

If synchronisation back to AD is required in order serve other applications (e.g. an on-premises SharePoint farm) then a custom solution could provide synchronisation from EXO to AD but this process should compress and shrink images as the recommended size of thumbnailPhoto images is only 96×96 and 10Kb.

Paul.


Azure AD app wildcard Reply URL

Azure AD apps (a.k.a Azure Active Directory apps, a.k.a AAD apps) are an essential component when interacting with Office 365 data outside of SharePoint – Mail, Calendar, Groups, etc.

As an O365 developer I have found myself writing JavaScript code against AAD apps (using ADAl.js) and often, especially during development, found myself entering a long list of Reply URLs. Reply URLs must be specified for any location from which authentication to AAD occurs. From a practical standpoint this results in someone (an Azure Administrator) having to update the list of Reply URLs every time a web part is inserted into a page or a new site is provisioned which relies on an Azure AD app.

If this is not done, the user is redirected to Azure login failure with ‘The reply address … does not match the reply addresses configured for the application’.

Error when Reply URL is not correctly specified
Error when Reply URL is not correctly specified

Perhaps the following is documented elsewhere but I have not come across it – a Reply URL can be specified using wildcards!

Using a wildcard Reply URL when configuring an AAD app
Using wildcard Reply URLs when configuring an AAD app

Probably the most common use for this is to end a Reply URL with an asterisk (wildcard) which will permit any URL which begins with the characters preceding it.

e.g. https://tenant.sharepoint.com/*
This example would support any URL coming from any page in SharePoint Online from within the named tenant.

It is also possible to use the wildcard character elsewhere in the Reply URL string.
e.g. https://*.sharepoint.com/*
This example would support any URL coming from any page in SharePoint Online from within *any* tenant.

Armed with this knowledge, be responsible and limit strictly how it is utilised. The implementation of Reply URL is a security feature and it is important that only trusted locations are allowed to interact with your app. I recommend only using wildcard Reply URLs in development environments.

Paul.

Creating dynamic links to Delve pages

Delve, as part of the Office 365 suite, provides a number of useful pages for finding content or people that are trending around you or that you recently interacted with. Often, as a Developer, these pages are the perfect target for “See More” links as part of customisations written using the Office Graph. Or perhaps as an administrator you would like to configure a promoted link on a team site home page to navigate to a user’s ‘Your Recent Documents’ page in Delve, for example.

Delve recent document page
The Delve Recent Documents page. Note that the URL contains the user’s AAD object ID.

Delve Links – a minor problem

When you visit pages that show content relevant to a specific user (such as Your Recent Documents or the Recent Documents page for another user) the URL of that page contains a query string variable ‘u’ with the value of this variable equal to the Azure Active Directory (AAD) object ID of the user. Azure Active Directory is the identity provider that backs Office 365 and is out the scope of this post. If this parameter is not provided then Delve falls back to the Delve homepage. I would have preferred it to have just used the current user if the parameter is not present, but no, this is how it works.

So, you can fetch the AAD Object ID by calling into the User Profile Service (Vardhaman Deshpande), however this is not necessary.

Delve Links – an easy resolution

The ‘u’ query string parameter can be substituted for the ‘p’ query string parameter where the value of p is the user’s account name – the email address which they use to login as.

This value is present on any SharePoint 2013+ page via the JavaScript variable: _spPageContextInfo.userLoginName
This can be utilised as follows:

var mySiteHostUrl = "https://-my.sharepoint.com";
var pageKey = "liveprofilemodified"; // liveprofilemodified='Recent Documents', liveprofileworkingwith='People page'
var delveUrl = mySiteHostUrl + "/_layouts/15/me.aspx" + "?v=" + pageKey + "&p=" + _spPageContextInfo.userLoginName;

Delve Links – side note

This value is present as an Office Graph property as: AccountName
The AAD Object is present as an Office Graph property as: AadObjectId

Paul.

Convert an existing plain text note field/column to rich text

If you create a SharePoint site column (a note field in this case), associate it with a site content type, and then associate that content type with a list in a sub site, the site column will be available on that library. Obviously right?

However, when you update the site column (and push all changes to lists and libraries) not *all* of the changes you make are in fact pushed down. An example of this is the setting that dictates whether a note field should allow rich text or enforce plain text. If you change this setting at the site column level it will *not* propagate to libraries which already exist. New instances of the column (say if you associated the content type with a list for the first time) will be configured correctly, but existing list-level instances are not updated. NOTE: This is only true for properties specific to particular column type; common properties such as ‘required’ will be pushed down to existing instances of the column at the list level.

Configuring a SharePoint note field to support rich text
Configuring a SharePoint note field

So you want to change a list-level instance of a plain text note column to a rich text note column (or vice-versa, or otherwise change column specific properties or another field type)? You need to do it for every list where the column is in use. That would be very tedious to do via the SharePoint UI, but you can’t anyway. The UI only supports changing the set of common field properties (type, required, hidden, etc).

In comes PowerShell. Below you will find a script which updates a plain text note column to be a rich text note column. It is important to note that this script only updates the list-level columns and not the site column. This means that after running the script, new instances will continue to inherit the site column configuration.

The script takes advantage of recursion using delegate functions which is an approach I blogged about here: PowerShell Recursion with Delegate Functions

Credit also to Chris O’Brien’s topofscript.ps1 for the CSOM integration bit: Using CSOM in PowerShell scripts with Office 365

The script is written for SharePoint Online (and assumes that the SharePoint Online Client Components SDK is installed) but for this to work on-premises you would only need to update the referenced assemblies (v15 for 2013) and modify the code which passes the credentials.

Paul.

Azure CDN integration with SharePoint, cache control headers max-age, s-maxage

After recently implementing an Azure-based solution to mitigate SharePoint Online’s poor image rendition performance by utilising Azure CDN (see Chris O’Brien’s post on this issue, see Fran R’s post on other Image Rendition issues) I’ve reached a few conclusions regarding setting appropriate cache control headers. It is important to reach a practical balance between performance and receiving updates to files.

Azure CDN logo

Before continuing it is important to understand the fundamental building blocks when using a CDN. At any time a file can be present in three location types: the blob or source file, the CDN endpoint(s), and users’ browser caches. In the case of Azure CDN, the source file must be a blob in Azure Blob Storage. Depending on the CDN/configuration it is likely that the file may be cached at many (dozens) of CDN endpoints dispersed around the globe. Without a CDN the only consideration is the cache timeout for files stored at the user’s browser cache. When considering a CDN we must also consider the cache timeout between the CDN endpoint and the source file.

Another important point to call out is that CDNs generally only push content to an endpoint when is it first requested: on-demand. This will incur a delay for the first user to request that asset from a given endpoint, while source blob is transferred to the endpoint. The impact of this will differ depending on the distance between the source blob and the CDN endpoint and the file size. It is this process that increasing the s-maxage header prevents (discussed below).

Relevant cache control headers

Definitions

  • max-age : Defines the period which, until reached, the client will used the cached file without contacting the server. ‘Client’ refers to a user’s browser cache as well as a CDN.
  • s-maxage : If provided, overrides max-age for CDNs only
  • public : Explicitly marks the file as not user specific
  • no-transform : Proxy servers may compress or encode images to improve performance or reduce bandwidth traffic. This header prevents this for occurring. It is preferable to avoid this header assuming that you can spare the effort to ensure the files being served are not affected adversely.

A good summary of the many remaining cache control headers that I didn’t feel were relevant to this post can be found here:
A beginners guide to HTTP cache headers

In practice

  • For an image that has been previously requested:
    • When s-maxage has not expired and max-age has not expired, server responds with 200 (OK), the file is not downloaded again [0ms]
    • When s-maxage has not expired but max-age has expired, server responds with 304 (not modified), the file is not downloaded again [<100ms]
    • When s-maxage has expired but max-age has not expired, server responds with 200 (OK), the file is not downloaded again [0ms]
    • When s-maxage has expired and max-age has expired and the blob has not changed, server responds with 304 (not modified), the file is not downloaded again [<100ms]
    • When s-maxage has expired and max-age has expired and the blob has changed, server responds with 200 (OK), the file is downloaded again [download image]
  • A request for an image will return 200 (OK) until max-age has expired and then 304 (not modified) for every subsequent request until the blob is updated. Once updated, this process repeats
  • If an existing image is updated, the longest a user can wait to see the updated image is
    • Without clearing browser cache: max-age + s-maxage
    • With clearing browser cache: s-maxage
  • If an user views an image from the CDN for the first time, it is only guaranteed to be the latest version of that image if the blob hasn’t been updated in the last s-maxage
  • SharePoint library images are served with a max-age of 24 hours
  • As SharePoint library images are not served via a CDN they have an effective s-maxage of 0

My recommendations

Keeping all of the above in mind, I feel that the most important factor is to replicate the experience that users expect from images being served from the SharePoint environment. This can presented as a couple of simple rules:

  1. max-age + s-maxage = 24 hours = 86400 seconds
  2. s-maxage is as low as possible whilst satisfying bandwidth and performance targets (especially for locations most distant to the source blob)

For a recent SharePoint/CDN, I used the following cache control headers:

  • max-age: 23 hours
  • s-maxage: 1 hour
  • public
  • no-transform

Which looks like this:
no-transform,public,max-age=82800,s-maxage=3600

Setting the cache headers served by Azure CDN and Azure Blob Storage

When working with cache control headers in Azure, they are set on the blob itself. It is not a CDN configuration setting.

Paul.

Search Schema Scoping in SharePoint Online

For solutions that are contained in a single site collection, or span a small number of site collections, or are in a tenant where the other solutions are not trusted or are unknown, then I have a strong preference to use site collection scoped search schema rather than tenant scoped.

Side note: I am yet to come across a situation where I would use site scoped search schema. In my mind, the existence of search schema at this level only serves to confuse.

Search Schema hierarchy is SharePoint Online.
Search Schema hierarchy is SharePoint Online. There is also site scoped search schema at lowest level which is not present here.

For those that aren’t fully aware, search schema (the set of managed properties that are accessible via the search framework) can be provisioned at the tenant, site collection, or site scope. These scopes are hierarchical such that managed properties are inherited from the tenant scope down to the site scope but can be overridden along the way. There are some good articles that delve into this in more detail.

By provisioning search schema at the site collection level you are mitigating the risks of errors related to other solutions changing the properties which your solution relies upon. This is especially relevant in SharePoint Online where all solutions in the tenant have to share a common set of RefinableTypeXX managed properties.

There are some important exceptions, of course.

  1. People Search, a.k.a User Profile Search, a.k.a Local People Results
    In SharePoint Online, people properties are indexed on a very slow schedule. We requested more information from Microsoft regarding this and were told that this schedule is ‘confidential’. I have found that when using site-collection scoped managed properties it can take *weeks* for them to get populated. I have found much better (although still poor) performance using tenant scoped properties (usually within a few days). Assuming you do require custom search schema for people properties I would still recommend provisioning all remaining managed properties (all those not mapped to people properties) at the site collection level.
  2. Many site collections
    Of course, having many site collections which require the same search schema is valid reason to go tenant scoped. This is purely due to management of the properties going forwards. A solid scripted deployment procedure should not care if you are provision search schema to 1 or 50 site collections – but anyone maintaining the solution will definitely care if they have update 50 schemas manually, or are suddenly required to script something which they feel should be *easy*. Even in this scenario you should still consider how much you trust other solutions in the tenant against the impact of finding out that one day your managed properties are mapped incorrectly. Depending on your solution this could lead to errors that are left undetected, or conversely obviously break your home page.

Paul.

Follow documents from search hover panel

There is a somewhat confusing logic behind when the FOLLOW button is displayed on the search results hover panel (a.k.a document preview).

A document hover panel with both the POST and FOLLOW buttons present
A document hover panel with both the POST and FOLLOW buttons present

What I am talking about?

If you are building a solution that relies on the following of documents but you are using Yammer rather than the SharePoint social feed then you may be wondering why, from the search results hover panel, you can follow pages, users, sites, but not most document types.

NB. If you are finding that you can’t following anything, check that web scoped feature ‘Follow Content’ has been activated on each site which contains content you wish to be able to follow.

NB. You can still follow the document types in question by clicking ‘view in library’ and using the library item menu to follow.

In many cases, wanting both POST and FOLLOW doesn’t make a lot sense as a primary reason of following documents is to populate the activity feed which is not available when Yammer is being used as the enterprise social experience. As such, please consider why you want this behaviour at all. In my scenario the user’s list of followed documents is promoted to the home page and bookmarking documents is a key user story.

What is going on?

The search results hover panel is built from a number of display templates which you can read about in more depth here (TechNet) or here (Chris O’Brien) or many other places.

Importantly, there is a display template which defines the common actions (buttons) across the bottom of the hover panel and when to display them. The display template is called Item_CommonHoverPanel_Actions and can be found here:

Site Settings > Master Pages and Page Layouts > Display Templates > Search > Item_CommonHoverPanel_Actions.html

If you inspect this display template you will find an if else block around the rendering of the POST and FOLLOW buttons. The logic can be summarised as:
The POST button is visible if Yammer is enabled and the result type supports it, otherwise the FOLLOW button is visible if the result type supports it, at no time will both buttons be visible.

If you download a copy of the display template HTML file, update it to remove the ‘else’ as in the code snippet below, and then upload it again, you will find the both the POST and FOLLOW buttons will be displayed in the search hover panel when supported. Success!

But is it okay update that file?

The short answer is yes. Take care as this file is used by every hover panel in SharePoint (to my knowledge, there may be some completely unique ones) and so changes could break something that isn’t obvious.

The major risk is that if Microsoft decide to update the hover panel which require them to produce a new version of the display template file (they have done this previously when introducing the POST button). In the case that you have modified this file, then your changes will be lost. This can happen without warning (unless you have a second tenant on first release to catch these issues before they hit production – you should be doing this!).
For very minor updates such as this, and to support non-critical functionality, it may be okay to make these changes and be prepared to re-implement them should Microsoft issue an update.

The alternative is to make a copy of the display template with a new name. This approach means that your changes will not get overridden but it also means that your solution will not get the updates that would otherwise be pushed to this file. We call this ‘customisation tax’ and it is a trade off as to which way you’d rather push changes.
In this particular scenario this latter approach is not very practical as every result type references the existing display template. You would be required to make copies of all the result type display templates that are applicable (possibly a dozen or more), and update the result types themselves to use your new templates. Unless you are bypassing result types and using a single display template for all results, this feels overly complex for such a minor change, but major changes will necessitate the effort.

EDIT: A colleague of mine, Luis Manez, pointed out that with a little JS you can force a custom hover panel to be rendered for all result types. You can read about it (approach one) and some other approaches to associating custom hover panels here (Elio Struyf).

Paul.

SPO CSOM Error: For security reasons DTD is prohibited in this XML document

I found myself encountering the following error when authenticating to SharePoint Online using CSOM from PowerShell:

DTD_error
Exception calling “ExecuteQuery” with “0” argument(s): “For security reasons DTD is prohibited in this XML document. To enable DTD processing set the DtdProcessing property on XmlReaderSettings to Parse and pass the settings into XmlReader.Create method.”

I believe that there a number of causes for this issue some of which are firewall and ISP related. This may only resolve a subset of the cases where this issue has been arising, even under the same circumstances.

In my scenario, I found that this issue was only arising when the credentials I was passing were being federated. That is, when the username was *not* in form <me>@<domain>.onmicrosoft.com but rather something like <me>@<domain>.co.uk. It is also possible that this issue resolves itself after a single successful authentication has occurred. Try providing credentials for a *.onmicrosoft.com account, and if that works try again with a federated account. This is discussed more later.

I used Fiddler to compare the request/response trace from a successful authentication and one where this error occurs. It turns out that somewhere internally a request is made to msoid.<full-domain> where <full-domain> is the bit after the @ symbol from the username provided. In the case where this value is of the *.onmicrosoft.com variety, a 502 error (no DNS entry) is returned with no request body and the authentication proceeds successfully. In the other case, the ‘msoid’ URL is resolved and a response with a request body is returned.
In my case the response was a 301 error (permanent relocation), however I read of cases where a 200 (success) has been received. Importantly to note, is that the response, success or otherwise, returns an HTML body containing a DTD (Document Type Declaration), and in turn produces the rather unhelpful error message.

So how do you fix it? Well one way is to provide an entry in your hosts file which ensure that the msoid URL will be invalid. I found that providing a local host entry for it worked. Your hosts file can be found here:
C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc

I added a line which looks like the following:

127.0.0.1        msoid.<domain>.co.uk

And it worked! Intriguingly I found that if I then removed this line from my hosts file, SharePoint Online authentication from PowerShell continued to work. It is for this reason that I suggested trying to use a *.onmicrosoft.com account first at the begging of this post – just in case it resolves the issue for you without touching the hosts file. Please comment if you have any success (or otherwise) with that approach.

Hope this helps! Good luck.

SharePoint licencing limitations: Standard vs Enterpise Features and Kiosk Users

When discussing Office 365 licencing there are a number of things that as an architect or developer you must be aware of.

EDIT: A handy Excel tool for checking which features are available for different licence types can be found here: Office 365 service comparison

Image of Buying kiosk licences
Buying kiosk licences

Creating solutions for limited users
Kiosk users are the cheap users will the greatest restrictions. However the limitations placed on these users really are quite manageable in many circumstances and shouldn’t cause you particular worry when developing a solution for these users. The key points to remember when providing a solution to these users is:

  • They don’t have a user profile. They can still view the ‘My Settings’ page, but not the ‘About Me’ page. These users still have the full set of user profile properties which can be set by an administrator or via AD synch and programmed against.
  • They can only use Office Web Apps in READ mode. They cannot edit documents with a client version of the correct Office application. Kiosk users from a K2 licence (opposed to K1) can also edit documents using OWA.
  • They can’t be administrators at the tenant or site collection level. However they can be granted Full Control permissions.

Be aware of the feature set available in Production
Many features will not be present or will not work under some licencing schemes. The primary issue which I have encountered is around content rollup. Licences which do not support the Enterprise feature set do not support the Content Search Web Part. You can use the Results Script Web Part instead, but remember that the display templates used are not transferable. The Content Search Web Part display templates reference the Srch javascript namespace which will not be present if using the Results Script Web Part.
There are obviously many other Enterprise features which I won’t mention explicitly but have a browse over the below table:

 

Developer features Only in SharePoint Server 2013—Enterprise Edition
Access Services Yes
BCS: Rich Client Integration Yes
BCS: Tenant-level external data log Yes
Custom Site Provisioning Yes
InfoPath Forms Services Yes
Analytics Platform Yes
Improved Self-Service Site Creation Yes
eDiscovery Yes
Preservation hold library Yes
Video Search Yes
WCM: Catalog Yes
WCM: Cross-site publishing Yes
WCM: Faceted navigation Yes
WCM: Image Renditions Yes
WCM: Multiple Domains Yes
WCM: Topic Pages Yes
Business Intelligence Center Yes
Calculated Measures and Members Yes
Data Connection Library Yes
Decoupled PivotTables and PivotCharts Yes
Excel Services Yes
Field list and Field Support Yes
Filter Enhancements Yes
Filter Search Yes
PerformancePoint Services Yes
PerformancePoint Services (PPS) Dashboard Migration Yes
Power View Yes
PowerPivot Yes
Quick Explore Yes
Scorecards & Dashboards Yes
Timeline Slicer Yes
Visio Services Yes
Content Search Web Part Yes
Custom entity extraction Yes
Extensible content processing Yes
Query rules—advanced actions Yes
Search vertical: “Video” Yes
Tunable Relevancy Yes